Establishing Appropriate Child Support

Issues related to the financial support of children often tend to become more heated than the emotions that caused the parents relationship to dissolve in the first place. These heightened emotions and the resulting conflict often spill over into what should be a balancing of the children’s reasonable needs after a divorce or dissolution.

 

Determining what is appropriate child support is not always a simple answer. When you need a skilled and experienced family law lawyer who understands how to help you make this determination, call Christopher M. Alexander at (513) 228 – 1100, mobile (513) 226 – 8489, or email him at Chris@awklegal.com.

 

How is Child Support Determined?

 

Ohio law imposes a duty on both parents to support their children until age 18 and graduation from high school, but there are limited instances where child support can terminate earlier if a child emancipates before the age of 18. Although rare, child support obligations can extend beyond age 18 if the child has a physical or mental disability or if the parents agree to extend the obligation beyond emancipation.

 

Ohio law determines a monthly child support obligation for each parent based on their combined adjusted gross income and each parent’s respective contribution to the combined adjusted gross income. In establishing a parent's income for purposes of child support, each parent’s gross income may be adjusted for a variety of factors such as the obligation to pay child support for other children, the obligation to pay spousal support to a former spouse and the number of overnights the children reside with each parent on an annual basis.

 

In most instances, the nonresidential parent makes regular child support payments to the residential parent through the Child Support Enforcement Agency (“CSEA”). The CSEA is a governmental agency that is tasked with collecting child support from the nonresidential parent and distributing it to the residential parent. The residential parent also has a financial responsibly for the children, but the law assumes that the residential parent spends the required amount directly on the children in the form of food, clothing, shelter, education and basic living expenses.

 

Determining what is appropriate child support is not always a simple answer. When you need a skilled and experienced family law lawyer who understands how to help you make this determination, call Christopher M. Alexander at (513) 228 – 1100, mobile (513) 226 – 8489, or email him at Chris@awklegal.com.

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Call (513) 228 - 1100 or email Chris@awklegal.com